Your Baby’s Intelligence

Your Baby’s Intelligence

This month the New York Times ran an article written by Alison Gopnik on how babies and young children learn. Here is an excerpt that I found really interesting:

“The learning that babies and young children do on their own, when they carefully watch an unexpected outcome and draw new conclusions from it, ceaselessly manipulate a new toy or imagine different ways that the world might be, is very different from schoolwork. Babies and young children can learn about the world around them through all sorts of real-world objects and safe replicas, from dolls to cardboard boxes to mixing bowls, and even toy cellphones and computers. Babies can learn a great deal just by exploring the ways bowls fit together or by imitating a parent talking on the phone. (Imagine how much money we can save on “enriching” toys and DVDs!)
But what children observe most closely, explore most obsessively and imagine most vividly are the people around them. There are no perfect toys; there is no magic formula. Parents and other caregivers teach young children by paying attention and interacting with them naturally and, most of all, by just allowing them to play.”

For the full article including a description of the researchers’ experiments, click here.

By giving children opportunities to imagine and explore a vast array of possibilities, their remarkably plastic and flexible brains will take in information that will be needed later as they mature and become more goal oriented. At Especially for Children we will give your child multiple opportunities to learn through play in activities that will allow them to explore cause and effect, imagine new possibilities and take full advantage of their powerful learning abilities.